Coffee Science

Does Low Elevation High Quality Coffee Threaten the Rainforest?

Does Low Elevation High Quality Coffee Threaten the Rainforest?

Buying high grown arabica in many ways supports the conservation of the rainforest.

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Non-foaming milk problems rampant in Canada

Barista

Non-foaming milk problems rampant in Canada

Corporate coffee does not require the micro-foam ability of milk, they are simply not making higher level textured micro-foam for latte art.

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Exploring Bitterness in Craft Beer, and how it relates to Coffee, Chocolate and other Foods

Exploring Bitterness in Craft Beer, and how it relates to Coffee, Chocolate and other Foods

We can safely extrapolate that this research shows humans are not naturally inclined to drink bitter ashy woody burnt acrid tar-like coffee. We are more likely to prefer sweeter tasting coffees. That's a high-five for 3rd wave cafes!

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The Art of Coffee Tasting And Judging Coffee Competitions

Specialty Coffee Competition

The Art of Coffee Tasting And Judging Coffee Competitions

Specialty Coffee is fresh, being served and consumed within 3 to 14 days from roast date. By contrast, commodity-based coffee will mostly be what we consider as stale. Specialty Coffee bags have ‘birth dates’, whereas commodity-based coffee bags have ‘death dates’. Most specialty roasters are transparent. They openly display the day it was roasted and also reveal  the beans used, including the names of the farms.

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Advanced Espresso Training

Barista

Advanced Espresso Training

It is up to baristas to change the false perception of espresso, one cup at a time. How? By learning to ‘dial-in’ their espresso.

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That neat and tidy map of tastes on the tongue you learned in school is all wrong

That neat and tidy map of tastes on the tongue you learned in school is all wrong

Our understanding of how taste information is carried from the tongue to the brain shows that individual taste qualities are not restricted to a single region of the tongue. There are two cranial nerves responsible for taste perception in different areas of the tongue: the glossopharyngeal nerve in the back and the chorda tympani branch of the facial nerve in the front. If tastes were exclusive to their respective areas, then damage to the chorda tympani, for instance, would take away one’s ability to taste sweet.

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